Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Denmark wind energy’

In the Globe and Mail today, there is an article about how Canadians feel apathetic about their government. In North Gower, the apathy seems connected to the faith that government WILL do something. Response to the issue of the wind turbines is either “They’ll never let that go through,” or, “If the government approves, it must be OK.”

Here are the facts about government involvement in industrial wind turbines:

-the City of Ottawa COULD join the dozens of other municipalities that have woken up to the fact that the Green Energy Act has removed their ability to plan their communities and protect their citizens, and are now asking for turbine developments to stop until health studies are done. But it won’t. City Council has already voted down a motion on that, saying it’s up to the province. It is, but that doesn’t mean you give up. What you can do: ask your councillor to re-submit the motion, and let the other councillors know how you feel.

-the City’s Medical Officer of Health was asked to look into the health effects of industrial wind turbines and report back to Council in January 2010. His report: he said he is going to follow the Province’s lead.

-the Province said it would appoint a Research Chair to look into health effects from “renewable energy technology”. The person the Council of Ontario Universities recommended is a professor of electrical engineering at Waterloo; he has zero experience in health research. What you can do: demand the Ontario government do independent, real health research (i.e., they actually have to examine and talk to people). Write the premier and let your MPP LisaMacLeod know your thoughts. PC leader Tim Hudak should be aware, too.

-the Province has allowed $1.5 million for five years for the research project. That might sound like a lot of money, but in research terms, it isn’t. It is very likely that nothing substantive will result. (One Ontario doctors has said, however, that a simple sleep study would cost only about $100,000.)

-the Province wants these wind developments to go through very badly; they see them as the great hope for Ontario jobs, and they say it is also our hope for clean, green, renewable energy. It isn’t: wind energy is expensive and unreliable, and the jobs it creates are in the initial stage of manufacturing and installation. Very few jobs result. According to the study of Denmark done by CEPOS there was NO net job creation from almost 20 years of wind development.

-Ontario and Quebec, at a minimum, have a dream of selling power to the U.S. That’s funny, because the U.S. wind developments have the same dream–selling power to Canada. What you can do: keep reading about the business and investment aspects of wind development. And check out your own investments to see whether you are investing in wind development yourself. You might be surprised.

-the federal government has no national standards for development of wind turbines, no health standards, no national strategy. When asked about it, they say it’s a provincial jurisdiction. And the province has taken care of that through the Green Energy Act: no one has any say in anything. What you can do: ask your MP to ask the government to develop national standards and an energy strategy.

If you are concerned about the effect of industrial wind turbines in North Gower-south Richmond because of constant noise and vibration, plus the potential effects on the environment, it’s up to you to let all levels of government know how you feel. Because right now, they’re not doing anything to help the people of Ontario who are living with industrial wind turbines.

Be sure to visit http://windconcernsontario.wordpress.com for daily news.

Read Full Post »

February 23rd, The Ottawa Citizen ran an editorial called “Seeing the wind” in which every popular notion about wind development is listed. Trouble is, none of them are correct.

Wind power is clean energy. No, it isn’t: the manufacturing and construction process for industrial wind turbines is significant, and huge amounts of fuel are required to transport the gigantic turbine parts. And, the turbines require power to run. In the “Wind Energy: the case of Denmark” study prepared by CEPOS in 2009, it was noted that in that country, which has had wind turbines for 20 years, ” wind power … saves neither fossil fuel consumption nor CO2 emissions.”

That’s a fact.

Ontario’s wind turbines are already in places where most people never see them. What? That would be nice if it were true, but it isn’t. In Melancthon there are over 100 turbines (soon to be almost 200) and the same for Amaranth. Turbines as far as the eye can see. Chatham-Kent? Hundreds and hundreds of turbines within kilometers of 6,000 people. North Gower? As many as 10 626-foot turbines within kilometers of hundeds of people and just over 3 km from a school. The turbines should be north of Superior where there is plenty of wind and no people but they’re not. Why? the transmission lines aren’t there but they are in the south of Ontario, which is also where all the people are.

That’s a fact.

New wind farms in Ontario will create long-term opportunities for manufacturers to supply them–and replace some of the jobs that the auto industry can no longer provide. Nonsense. The jobs created will be very few in number, and the subsidization means Ontario taxpayers are handing out more than $200,000 for each new job. Again from CEPOS in Denmark: “creating additional employment in one sector through subsidies will detract labor from other sectors, resulting in no increase in net employment.”

That’s a fact.

We’re unsure as to why the Citizen ran this editorial when their own columnist Randall Denley has gone on record with the truth about the wind development business in Ontario, which he says is more of the same “branch plant mentality” which does not foster innovation and long-term job or economic growth in Ontario.

For more information go to

http://energy.probeinternational.org/alternative-energy/renewables

and take special note of Michael Trebilcock’s column on wind development in Ontario.

Sorry to those who are only on dial-up: there is a binder of information at the North Gower Branch of the Ottawa Public Library, and the Library also has high-speed Internet (wireless, too!).

To get in touch with the North Gower Wind Action Group, email northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

Read Full Post »