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Posts Tagged ‘Marlborough wind project’

July 12

MPP Pierre Poilievre and MP Lisa MacLeod of Nepean-Carleton announced their demand for a moratorium on the proposed Marlborough wind project, planned for the North Gower-Richmond area of the City of Ottawa, at a joint news conference held in North Gower this morning.

In a quiet cul-de-sac in the Meadowbrook neighbourhood MacLeod and Poilievre noted that the power project is completely incompatible with the community.

Poilievre cited statistics on the noise that could be produced by the gigantic and powerful turbines and told the dozens of community members who gathered on the hot weekday morning that the recently announced Health Canada study on health effects and wind turbine noise will provide valuable information to help people from becoming ill due to the environmental noise produced by the machines.

Lisa MacLeod spoke of how she has supported the community in its opposition to the project for years and called on the Ontario government to halt development of wind power facilities until proper regulations for safety can be established.

Both the MP and MPP are among the first elected representatives to call for the moratorium.

North Gower Wind Action Group Chair and Wind Concerns Ontario president Jane Wilson said that the fact that Health Canada has recognized and acknowledge the health problems associated with large-scale wind turbines means that the federal government at least is listening to the concerns of citizens. She too called on the Ontario government to stop issuing approvals for wind projects and to help the people already affected. “This is not our Ontario, when people are not being heard.”

email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

or Wind Concerns Ontario at windconcerns@gmail.com

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An interview with Premier Dalton McGuinty was published in The Belleville Intelligencer. In it, the premier states that he doesn’t want “the headaches” associated with wind power generation projects going into communities that don’t want them.

The article is here: http://www.intelligencer.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3533375

This represents a substantial change from the Premier’s words in 2009 when he said one of the purposes of the Green Energy and Green Economy Act was to prevent “NIMBY” communities and citizens from blocking wonderful green energy projects.

Hmm.

Could it be that the Premier is looking for a way out of this disastrous policy, that even Ontario’s own Auditor general has said was embarked upon without proper study or cost-benefit analysis? That analyst after analyst is saying will bankrupt the province? And maybe, with the contracts in place or in process, he’s pretty close to his goal anyway?

It’s not like communities across Ontario haven’t spoken up with their objection to being steamrolled by big wind companies and the provincial government. Dozens have passed bylaws and motions and resolutions, they’ve written to the Premier, held demonstrations and more…it all fell on deaf ears.

Let’s hope the Premier is genuine and that now, what communities want–what the PEOPLE want–will really count for something.

In the meantime, e-mail your elected municipal representative and tell him/her what your wishes are. In North Gower/Richmond that is Mr Scott Moffatt, at scott.moffatt@ottawa.ca

E-mail us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

Follow us on Twitter at northgowerwind

Follow Wind Concerns Ontario on Twitter at windconcernsONT and on Facebook, website http://www.windconcernsontario.ca

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March 8th, 2012

Ms. Lisa MacLeod: It’s my absolute pleasure today to stand in this House to support my colleague from Huron–Bruce, Lisa Thompson, in her call for this McGuinty Liberal government to place a moratorium on further wind developments until appropriate studies have been in place and completed.
Because, Mr. Speaker, I can tell you, representing a large suburban rural riding that is on its way to being assaulted by this McGuinty Liberal government, that we expect in our rural communities to have locally-based decision-making restored to our communities. We expect that that subsidy for the FIT program is going to be ripped up so that our seniors and our small businesses don’t have to continue to subsidize their crazy experiments with energy.
We know that there have been lots of complaints from our community all our communities right across Ontario that there may be health and environmental effects because of this energy scheme of Dalton McGuinty’s. That’s why the Ontario PC caucus will stand firmly behind the member from Huron–Bruce, and we’re challenging other members from rural communities in this chamber to do the right thing. If you don’t vote for this motion today, you’ll be opposed to rural Ontario. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

UPDATE: the vote was lost 45-28. Liberals and NDP opposed. Lisa Thompson MPP looked across the House and said, You’re all from cities, this will never happen to YOU!

Thanks from the people of North Gower-Richmond-Kars to Lisa MacLeod for standing up for us today.

NEW DATES: March 22 Queen’s Park, Tim Hudak’s bill to end the FIT program; March 23rd and March 24th in Ottawa; April 3rd Toronto, rally at the FIT conference

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Well, we never stopped, really.

Premier Dalton McGuinty will be facing angry rural municipal councillors at the Ontario Good Roads conference beginning this weekend.

Organized by the  Multi-Municipal Wind Turbine Working Group–which is headed by Mark Davis, Deputy Mayor of Arran-Elderslie–the event will be a Walk Out on Dalton as the Premier stands up for his speech to open the conference. (In Ottawa we don’t have much hope of any representatives standing up for us, as the vice-president of the Rural Ontario Municipal Association or ROMA is Doug Thompson…he won’t likely abandon his position to act for us in North Gower and Richmond. But we can hope.)

The organizers acknowledge that such an action will be a first at a conference that is known for its bonhomie but they also say it’s about time. At last year’s conference, Mayor of Amaranth Don McIver met with then Environment Minister John Wilkinson to talk about what’s happened to Amaranth since the turbines started spinning in his community in 2006 (people are sick, property worthless, homes abandoned) and followed up with a letter. It was never answered. He sent another. No answer. Wilkinson of course was roundly defeated in the October election, but for his department to ignore a sitting Mayor is appalling.

Now, says Davis, it’s time to act. “Why not?” says Davis. “McGuinty has walked out on us.”

Here is a story from QMI today. http://www.lfpress.com/comment/2012/02/24/19422056.html

Rural Ontario set to blow up at McGuinty

By Jim Merriam, Special to QMI Agency

Last Updated: February 25, 2012 12:00am 

It won’t be the legendary gunfight at the O.K. Corral but next week’s meeting between Premier Dalton McGuinty and rural municipal leaders is shaping up to be a major confrontation.

The issue involves shunning Premier Dad at the Good Roads convention in Toronto.

One organizing group is urging delegates by letter to greet the premier with respect.

However, the Multi-Municipal Working Group on Wind Turbines isn’t backing down on plans to walk out on McGuinty’s speech if a one-year moratorium on installation of wind turbines isn’t announced before the meeting.

The Rural Ontario Municipal Association (ROMA), which sponsors “Good Roads” in partnership with the Ontario Good Roads Association, suggests such a walkout would be shortsighted.

“We invited the premier to our conference, we appreciate his decision to come, and we will respectfully listen to what he has to say,” says the ROMA letter, hoping for the final word on the subject.

The working group’s chair will have none of it. In his written response, Mark Davis, deputy mayor of Arran Elderslie said, “There are times you must stand up and be counted. You must do things that you believe are right for the people you represent. I firmly believe this is one of those times.” ROMA’s letter looks back at its successful history to discourage a walkout by the folks concerned about the way wind power has been forced down the throats of rural residents.

“As a group, Ontario municipalities have worked very hard over many years to build a relationship with the Government of Ontario that is based on open doors and frank discussion. The mature and respectful relationship that makes these exchanges possible provides us with our greatest opportunity to achieve meaningful progress.” But members of the six-county wind turbine working group are more interested in what ROMA has done for them lately?

“ROMA must be aware of the depth of these (wind turbine) concerns and we hope to hear at the conference the steps that ROMA, like the other organizations representing rural Ontario, has taken to represent concerns of its members on this issue.” ROMA goes on to list the issues it is discussing with the province including the global recession, economic development, funding for roads and bridges, the costs of emergency services and the Drummond report.

In response the anti-turbine group has a list of its own, pointing out those who have serious doubts about the “green energy program and wind turbines.” This includes the Ontario Auditor General who said the turbines are not replacing coal-fired plants nor cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

“They (turbines) require additional fossil-fuel gas generation back-up because their production is unpredictable, intermittent and cannot be stored.” This means consumers pay twice for wind energy, adding skyrocketing electricity costs that are a real threat to jobs.

Also joining the anti-turbine movement is the Ontario Federation of Agriculture that represents 38,000 farm families.

In addition 79 municipalities have called for a moratorium on wind turbine installations.

The working group also points out that the province responded within hours to a light rail transit motion by Toronto council, but there has been no meaningful response to rural concerns about wind turbines.

In summing up the fighting words ROMA attempts to speak for all Ontarians: “Ontario residents are counting on us to work co-operatively and productively.” The conclusion from the working group is quite different: “There are many reasons to walk and very few not to.”

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Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca and please donate to our efforts. You may donate securely by Interac or PayPal.

The North Gower Wind Action Group is a member of Wind Concerns Ontario http://www.windconcernsontario.ca

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One of the most preposterous claims from the wind power generation lobby is that there is no effect on property values for neighbouring properties when a wind power generation project is built nearby. They still claim that even though in Ontario, there is a question on the Ontario Real Estate Association’s Seller’s Property Information Sheet or SPIS that asks about plans for wind energy development projects, in the same line as garbage dumps and quarries. Sounds like a positive influence on value to us!!

The question has to be asked then, what will the effect be for Ontario of the rolling decline of property values throughout this province due to wind turbine projects? In the case of North Gower, using the Luxemburger model (which is now thought to be conservative) the $20-million “green energy” project will actually cost the community $45 million in lost property value.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s a news story about a new study on property values, from the U.S. Note the property value effect is seen at a distance of THREE MILES. How is that going to work for Ontario’s future, Messrs McGuinty, Wilkinson, and Duguid and Mme Pupatello?

Study finds wind turbines can sometimes be tough on neighbors’ property values

Published: Wednesday, July 06, 2011, 9:31 AM Updated: Wednesday, July 06, 2011, 11:00 AM

By Charles McChesney / The Post-StandardThe Post-Standard

Stephen D. Cannerelli / The Post-StandardLarge wind turbines cover the hillside in the Madison County town of Stockbridge in 2010.

Potsdam, NY — Wind farms reduced the value of nearby real estate in two Northern New York counties, but not in a third.

Martin D. Heintzelman and Carrie M. Tuttle, of Clarkson University, studied 11,331 real estate transactions over nine years and found that the value of property near wind turbines dropped in Clinton and Franklin counties. But they found no impact in Lewis County.

The paper they produced, “Values in the Wind: A Hedonic Analysis of WindPower Facilities,” hasn’t been finalized, Heintzelman said, but an earlier version has been shared by opponents of wind farms. (Hedonic is a economic term referring to estimating value or utility).

A March version of the paper, distributed by opponents of a wind-farm proposal for Cape Vincent in Jefferson County, found an overall decrease in values among properties neighboring wind turbines in Clinton, Franklin and Lewis counties.

But Heintzelman said the research was reviewed, and combining the counties, it turned out, “was not a reasonable approach.”

The refined findings are, he said, “somewhat more nuanced.”

Heintzelman said past research, including a study of Madison County, showed wind farms had little or no impact on real estate values. But he found that hard to believe.

“Anytime you put a large industrial or manufacturing facility in someone’s backyard,” he said, there is bound to be some impact.

So he and Tuttle, a graduate student, statistically analyzed real estate data, mostly from the state Office of Real Property Services.

They found that placing a wind turbine a half mile from the average property in Franklin or Clinton counties would result in a loss of property value of $10,793 to $19,046. The impact drops off as properties become more distant, he said. At the distance of three miles, the impact is $2,500 to $9,800.

But Lewis County, with the 321-megawatt Maple Ridge Wind Farm, was different. “Lewis County does not see negative impacts,” Heintzelman said.

Asked whether the study’s findings hold lessons for communities weighing wind-power projects, Heintzelman said it could be worth considering how those who have wind turbines near, but not on, their property might be compensated if they see their real estate drop in value.

Other than that, he said, “Sadly, no, I don’t think I have any specific advice.”

Contact us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Prowind president Cathy Weston has a letter published in today’s Woodstock Sentinel-Review, the newspaper for people living near Prowind’s two southern Ontario proposed projects. Here it is:

Dear Editor,

Mr. Desmond’s grandstand statements about the effects of wind turbines on surrounding property values are anecdotal in nature and certainly do not hold true to scientifi c rigor. A recent study completed within Chatham-Kent concluded there is no statistical evidence to demonstrate that wind farms negatively affect rural residential market values. ( http://www.canwea.ca/pdf/talkwind/Proper tyValuesConsultingReportFebruary42010.pdf)

His comments about the lack of opportunity for taxation because “senior management” are shied away from areas with wind farms is unsubstantiated. He further neglects to remind readers that wind turbines themselves generate tax revenue for the community. Municipalities receive annual tax dollars for the duration of the wind farm based on the output potential of each turbine. Local governments also benefit indirectly from the improvements to roads and other infrastructure that wind developers must upgrade in order to complete development.

Further, development, construction and operation of wind farms bring additional income to the community in the form of jobs and income to the landowners. The development of wind farms on agricultural properties ensures that farming activities can continue for years to come by providing supplementary income to farmers, and protecting against urbanization of rural areas.

The Green Energy Act aimed to streamline the approvals process, to reduce duplication of time and effort in proposal review, and to offer a consistent approach to renewable energy development throughout the Province. That said, the uniqueness of each community in Ontario must continue to be respected. Prowind Canada considers local governments to be an important stakeholder in all projects, providing strong representation for the area. Township and county officials are consulted on all major elements of project development to ensure that their feedback and requirements specific to the community are incorporated into project design.

The wind energy industry is committed to responsible and sustainable development in Ontario and across the country. Setbacks in Ontario for wind turbines are among the most stringent in the world and are designed to protect health and safety of the public. In March 2011, the Ontario Divisional Court decision upheld the current regulations for wind turbine setbacks of 550 metres, stating that these distances were established through extensive public consultation, considering the views of a wide range of stakeholders.

Cathy Weston, President, Prowind Canada Inc.

You can make up your own mind but we have a couple of points for discussion:

-the Chatham-Kent property value study (also known as the Simmons-Canning report, paid for by the Canadian Wind Energy Association/CanWEA) was rife with errors; the authors couldn’t get the results they wanted so they ran analysis after analysis to come to their conclusion. It must be noted that the authors relied only on VIEW of the turbines as a potential factor affecting value; they note that noise and other effects could affect value but they did not study that. There are other studies that DO show a loss in property value such as Appraisal One Group, Chris Luxemburger (who has been a guest in North Gower), Michael McCann and more. For an interview with an Ontario Realtor discussing property values and industrial wind turbines, go to: http://www.bayshorebroadcasting.ca/news_item.php?NewsID=35521 His opinion? 25-40% drop in value. Note also that the Ontario Real Estate Association now lists power projects such as wind turbine installations along with garbage dumps and gravel quarries on its Sellers’ Property Information Sheet or SPIS.

-While it is true that the landowners leasing land for industrial wind turbines are paid for their leases, there are very few jobs associated with industrial wind power projects. Most of the jobs are in the very short-term for construction, and then afterward, there is only one job per 10 turbines at most, if you follow the example of other projects. At Wolfe Island, for example, three local jobs have been created, for 86 turbines.

-“Protecting against urbanization of rural areas”???????????? We fail to see how industrializing a village and its surroundings by installing an industrial wind power generation project is protecting anything.

Let’s have another quote from Prowind, shall we? Bart Geleynse, speaking to Mark Sutcliffe on Rogers TV, April 2010. Sutcliffe: Do the turbines make noise? Geleynse: “Of course they do; they’re power plants.”

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Here from a recent presentation is Grey County Realtor Mike McMurray’s opinion on what happens to property values when industrial wind turbine projects are planned. Note that the property in question is only at the OPTION stage.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JURSfyckET4

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca  and follow us on Twitter at northgowerwind

Note: screening of award-winning documentary film Windfall in North Gower June 26th at 2 p.m. Admission $5; seating limited.

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