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Posts Tagged ‘noise wind turbines’

July 12

MPP Pierre Poilievre and MP Lisa MacLeod of Nepean-Carleton announced their demand for a moratorium on the proposed Marlborough wind project, planned for the North Gower-Richmond area of the City of Ottawa, at a joint news conference held in North Gower this morning.

In a quiet cul-de-sac in the Meadowbrook neighbourhood MacLeod and Poilievre noted that the power project is completely incompatible with the community.

Poilievre cited statistics on the noise that could be produced by the gigantic and powerful turbines and told the dozens of community members who gathered on the hot weekday morning that the recently announced Health Canada study on health effects and wind turbine noise will provide valuable information to help people from becoming ill due to the environmental noise produced by the machines.

Lisa MacLeod spoke of how she has supported the community in its opposition to the project for years and called on the Ontario government to halt development of wind power facilities until proper regulations for safety can be established.

Both the MP and MPP are among the first elected representatives to call for the moratorium.

North Gower Wind Action Group Chair and Wind Concerns Ontario president Jane Wilson said that the fact that Health Canada has recognized and acknowledge the health problems associated with large-scale wind turbines means that the federal government at least is listening to the concerns of citizens. She too called on the Ontario government to stop issuing approvals for wind projects and to help the people already affected. “This is not our Ontario, when people are not being heard.”

email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

or Wind Concerns Ontario at windconcerns@gmail.com

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Health Canada announced a study into the possible links between the noise and infrasound (the wind industry has denied that there are any links, and that infrasound even exists) and health effects, saying there is a “knowledge gap” and a lack of scientific evidence to drive policy.

And, in other news, Nepean-Carleton MP Pierre Poilievre announced an open letter to Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, asking for a moratorium on the North Gower-Richmond wind power project, due to concerns about health and property values.

This is a good forward step, and encouraging that the federal government has recognized the existence of the complaints from people already living with turbines, recognized the role of both environmental noise and infrasound, and recognized that there is a lack of solid clinical research. (The Chief Medical Officer of Health for Ontario report was simply a literature review, and it too, said there was a need for more research, particularly related to the issue of noise.)

Comments are invited over the next 60 days at

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/consult/_2012/wind_turbine-eoliennes/index-eng.php

The study design will be key: WHERE will the studies be conducted (the turbines in Alberta are not the same as what has been shoehorned into Ontario) and WHEN (some periods of the year are windier and therefore less noisy than others. Other questions exist too, but we are not epidemiologists.
Nepean-Carleton residents may wish to send a comment to Mr Poilievre as he offers support to local residents, concerned about the potential effects on our community.

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In the current issue of Rural Voice, publication of the National Farm Union of Canada, is a column by Ontario resident Robert Budd.

Right off, he puts the boots to the notion that we must bring in wind power because people are dying from coal. In Ontario right now, less than 3 % of our power is produced from coal-fired power generation … and we’re only using coal because we need to keep the plants on in case of a high peak of demand. Mr Budd notes that Denmark uses far more coal to create power, and comments, “If people are dying in Ontario from 4 percent coal use, it’s a wonder the Danes aren’t extinct…”

Indeed.

If only these arguments were just silly, and not a horrendous excuse for industrializing communites, wrecking scenic vistas in a thoroughly beautiful province, crushing property values and actually making people ill.

Read Mr Budd’s column here … and be inspired to write something yourself!

http://freewco.blogspot.ca/2012/06/why-green-energy-doesnt-always-make.html?showComment=1339189964480

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca and follow us on Twitter at northgowerwind

 

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New South Wales in Australia is being blanketed by industrial wind turbines, in spite of health concerns, rising electricity costs and even a full Senate inquiry into wind power generation.

The effects have been devastating. Here is an interview with sheep farmer Anne Gardner, whose home is a shocking 90 meters from a wind turbine and whose farms is near a wind power generation project, on what has happened to her. She farms sheep for wool and had produced a quality of wool among the best in the world.

The disgust and anger is apparent in the interviewer’s voice as he concludes, we hope that the people will win out eventually.

Our view: legal action is the only resort left to us, when we are fighting the combination of big business and our own government.

Take a few moments to listen to the radio broadcast here: http://www.2gb.com/index2.php?option=com_newsmanager&task=view&id=12922#.T8Q_ITCNCMQ.facebook

If you have a few more minutes, check out this TV news interview, also from Australia: every single point to be made about wind power generation and its effects is in this interview. http://www.todaytonightadelaide.com.au/?page=Story&StoryID=1394

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca and follow us on Twitter at northgowerwind

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Excellent article by Justin Sadler in yesterday’s Ottawa Sun. Mr Sadler quite rightly reviews comments by the Auditor General on the issue of Ontario’s renewable energy policy–there was never a business case made for the policy, no estimates of whether wind power would ever accomplish what was promised for it, and that claims of job creation are just not true.

Read the article here, and then vote in the poll if it remains open.

http://www.ottawasun.com/2012/05/26/turbine-tussle-whips-up

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

Donations toward our work and information packages for government at all levels, gratefully accepted

PO Box 3, North Gower ON   K0A 2T0

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Please check the maps in our documents and links page to see what the Marlborough wind project in North Gower-Richmond looks like, in terms of impact on the community.

One map shows the 2-km impact; this is based on the recent announcement by the Society for Wind Vigilance–a group of international scientists and health care professionals–that a 2-km setback is the MINIMUM for health and safety.

The other map shows the impact out to 3.2 km on property values.  This is based on the 40% AVERAGE property value loss determined by U.S. real estate appraiser Michael McCann.

If you live in North Gower-Richmond, be sure to be sitting down before you look at the maps.

And then remember that then-president of Prowind Cathy Weston wrote to a news paper last year that “wind farms” have the effect of protecting agricultural land from further housing development. No kidding.

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Important Protest against wind power subsidy by Ontario Citizens

April 3

The Ontario Feed In Tariff or FIT program has been responsible for unbridled industrial wind power development throughout Ontario. The results? Huge profits for wind power developers. And unreliable, inefficient and expensive wind power that Ontario doesn’t need, despoiled rural communities, dropping property values, diminished tourism potential and worst of all, serious health effects for some people in Ontario.

 

Now, the Wind Industry Barons are blowing into Toronto for the Ontario Feed In Tariff Forum April 3 & 4th  at the Metro Convention Centre, 255 Front Street West.

 

ONTARIO CITIZENS WILL BE ON THE STREET TO TELL THEM FIT IS A “BAD FIT”
FOR ONTARIO!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Protest Date Tuesday, April 3rd

Time – gather at 11:30

Speakers – 12:00

Protest March 12:30

Place – Simcoe Park on Front Street, beside CBC building and opposite Metro Toronto Convention Centre

 

It is time to stand up for Ontario!

 People are coming from all parts of the province. Bring signs to identify where you are from. 

 

Arrange a bus or use public transit, subways, GO trains to Union Station.  See you there.

Directions: From the main lobby of Union Station (look for signs to railway and GOTrain station to get to main lobby), exit at Front Street, go west (left) on Front St. past York St. and Lower Simcoe St.  Simcoe Park is about 300 meters further west right next to the CBC building on the north side of Front St. 

For more details, check the Wind Concerns Ontario website at http://www.windconcernsontario.ca

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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From today’s National Post:

Anne Murray, Tim Hortons’ magnate Ron Joyce tee off over wind farm

Sarah Boesveld Feb 21, 2012 – 11:55 PM ET | Last Updated: Feb 22, 2012 12:06 AM ET

 

Rickobrienphotographer.com / Files; Paul Darrow / National Post files

Canadian music legend Anne Murray, left, and Tim Hortons co-founder Ron Joyce disagree on the impact a proposed wind farm, similar to the Alberta wind farm pictured at the top of the page, will have on the economy of picturesque Pugwash, N.S.

Almost every year from July to October, Canadian music legend Anne Murray returns to picturesque Pugwash, N.S., where she spent her summers as a child. She practises her swing at the local first-class golf course and marvels at the way the little place she’d visit to attend church on Sundays has blossomed into a tourist destination — a jewel along the Northumberland Strait.

Nearby is Fox Harb’r, the luxury golf course and resort owned by Tim Hortons’ magnate Ron Joyce, another kid from Nova Scotia’s northwestern shore made good.

Now, the area’s two most celebrated icons are publicly disagreeing over wind turbine construction in the area after the Snowbird singer publicly spoke out against a 12-turbine wind farm proposed for two kilometres outside Pugwash.

Related

“Pugwash is my favourite place in the whole world…. It’s more important to me than any other place,” the celebrated singer said by phone from Jupiter, Fla. “I just think it’s the wrong place [to erect a wind farm]. The government would be shooting themselves in the foot to take a community that’s growing and thriving and put a stop to it.”

Ms. Murray worries the whirring and thumping of wind turbines, which can stand up to 40 storeys high, will repel people from the area, turn tourists away, claw back property values and damage animal habitats.

On Monday, she sent a letter to Nova Scotia Premier Darrell Dexter warning that a wind farm would have a “catastrophic impact” on the economy and environment in the area.

Though the singer and golf enthusiast says she has not spoken with neighbour Mr. Joyce about the project and doubts it would affect his business, she said a wind farm at Pugwash would “just be the beginning, because it will go all the way down the coast. That’s what the fear is.”

Mr. Joyce, who was born in nearby Tatamagouche, N.S., and invested in the first Tim Hortons doughnut shop in 1964 and built it into an international chain, said he’s unfazed by wind farm concerns in a province that already has 26 wind farm projects, according to the Canadian Wind Energy Association.

“I am aware of Anne’s ongoing negative comments on wind farms,” he said in an email to the National Post. “I personally am not a supporter of her argument. [T]he world is moving forward for a better source than fossil fuels…. I see no major negatives in countries that have them.”

Her letter comes just weeks after the province registered an assessment of the Pugwash Wind Farm, to be developed by North Cumberland Wind Farm LP. Ms. Murray and the Gulf Shore Preservation Association, a local citizens’ group, are worried the province accepted an incomplete environmental assessment that failed to carry out archeological, bat and migratory bird studies and first nations consultations. They say five of the turbines will be built in wetlands — a “clear contravention” of the province’s environmental laws, Ms. Murray said.

 

The Gulf Shore Preservation Association has called for Environment Minister Sterling Belliveau to suspend the 30-day public comment period, which opened the day the assessment was registered, Feb. 6, based on 17 “deficiencies” they identified. After 30 days of public input, Mr. Belliveau will decide whether to approve the environmental assessment, deny it or ask for further study, ministry spokesperson Lori Errington said.

“Nothing’s written in stone at this point,” she said. “Certainly we’ll be considering all the aspects the wind farm would involve.”

She confirmed Mr. Dexter received Ms. Murray’s letter and his office will respond. The singer’s letter will also be included in the public consultation dossier, Ms. Errington said.

Richard Gray, treasurer of the Gulf Shore Preservation Association, said he hopes Ms. Murray’s public objections will turn the tide in their favour. She’s been speaking out against the project since 2007 when the proposal was first made — Ms. Murray said that she was at first supportive of the wind farms because she favours alternative sources of power, but soon learned it is important they be placed far from communities.

The last time Ms. Murray spoke out, her comments were “distorted” to read like “‘It’s too bad wealthy Anne Murray won’t be able to play golf anymore,’” Mr. Gray said. “That’s not her position. I know Anne well … this goes back to her childhood. She’s very sensitive to fragile economies being destroyed.”

Ms. Murray grew up in the nearby coal mining town of Springhill, N.S. which suffered three mining disasters before that resource could no longer fuel the local economy.

Even now, the singer isn’t sure her activism will make any difference. But she swears she’ll do anything to protect her community (she rejects accusations of NIMBYism because her home is too far away from the proposed wind farm site to suffer any personal impact).

“If this doesn’t work, I certainly will have done everything I can to help the process along,” she said. “It could be falling on deaf ears everywhere, I don’t know. But I had to do something.”

National Post
• Email: sboesveld@nationalpost.com | Twitter:

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But don’t take our word for it.

We could quote you the research studies that have been done–epidemiologist Dr Carl V. Phillips says there are enough of them that it is beyond a shadow of a doubt, and the World Health Organization has documented serious health effects from “environmental noise”—but let’s go to the Township of Amaranth in Ontario.

Almost six years ago now, the Township welcomed industrial wind turbines, believing the promises of jobs and green energy. They thought they were doing the right thing.

How’s that working for them? Not so well.

Here from a letter to the Minister of the Environment from Mayor Don McIver, the results of living with industrial wind turbines on one community.

“There is no question that the impact of wind turbines and the transformer that connects this power to the grid have negatively affected the health and wealth of neighbouring residents. The Council of the Township of Amaranth is opposed to any further wind turbine projects until the negative impacts of the current wind farm are corrected.”

Families have become ill and have had to leave their homes, the Mayor writes; efforts have been made to alleviate the noise and the low frequency sound, and have failed (we know there is no proper methodology to measure turbine noise–all the setbacks etc are based on “modelling”).

“The setbacks in the Green Energy Act are not sufficient to protect the health and wealth of neighbouring families. The 5 km setback in the lake directly invalidates the setback of 550 metres on land.”

Tha Mayor’s letter has never been answered.

For in-person accounts, go to http://windconcernsontario.wordpress.com/video-testamonies/

to see videos of Ontario residents who have been living next to industrial wind power generation facilities.

This is no joke.

E-mail us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Many people believe that because there is a multi-step approval process for wind power projects in Ontario, there must be plenty of authoritative oversight along the way.

No.

First of all, let’s be clear: we are talking about industrial-scale wind power generation here, not the little iconic wind “mills” you used to see on farms in Ontario and which are still used to create power for limited use, like a water pump. That’s as far from the current industrial wind power projects as you can get.

Under the Green Energy and Green Economy Act  or the GEA in Ontario, wind power developers create a proposal for a project, then apply for a Feed In Tariff contract. If they get that (and that process is a whole other story) then they can proceed to preparing a Renewable Energy Application (REA) for submission to the Ministry of the Environment. Their draft REA is reviewed by certain “stakeholders” and then eventually shown to the public for comment. The company is required to hold two information sessions for the public; these are typically merely Open Houses. There is no formal presentation, no question and answer period, and no sign that comments from the public are recorded in any form.

After that, the company submits the REA, gets a Certificate of Approval (the MoE is currently promising a one-month turnaround in the interest of speedy development) after which time the public has 15 days to appeal. As we saw from the Kent Breeze appeal in which a single citizen spent upwards of $150,000 to appeal the Suncor project in Chatham-Kent, the project proceeded even while under appeal, and by the time the decision was handed down in July 2011, was completed. (That project is now the subject of a $1.5 million lawsuit by a family who rapidly became ill after the project started.)

So the process is this:

-the companies do their own environmental screening according to the list of topics required in the regulations. They use private consultants (many of whom are members of the Canadian Wind Energy Association, a lobby group for the corporate wind industry) and do not seem to be required to provide information on those consultants’ credentials.

-the public has a limited time and frankly, limited ability to review and assess the assessments

-the environmental screening reports done by the corporate developers go to the Ministry of the Environment for review and approval. We have no idea the depth of the review process.

-There is no third-party, independent, professional review. Requests for “elevation” i.e., for a formal, full environmental assessment to be done by the Ministry of the Environment have been refused: not ONE has been granted since this began in 2006.

In short, the Ontario government believes so strongly that wind power is “good” and “green” it doesn’t really require a proper environmental assessment.

Worse: if environmental effects are experienced such as the bird kills at Wolfe Island (the developer TransAlta forecast 2 per year per turbine and has been surprised to find the rate exceeds 13 per turbine), the Ministry of the Environment simply RAISED the acceptable number of birds that could be killed.

Worse still: there is NO accepted methodology to measure environmental noise from industrial wind turbines—the MoE staff admit this! (See http://www.windyleaks.com )

That’s not acceptable to us.

Doesn’t sound very “environmental” either.

Wind power: it’s not what you think.

Want to live here?

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