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Posts Tagged ‘renewable energy Ontario’

Excellent article by Justin Sadler in yesterday’s Ottawa Sun. Mr Sadler quite rightly reviews comments by the Auditor General on the issue of Ontario’s renewable energy policy–there was never a business case made for the policy, no estimates of whether wind power would ever accomplish what was promised for it, and that claims of job creation are just not true.

Read the article here, and then vote in the poll if it remains open.

http://www.ottawasun.com/2012/05/26/turbine-tussle-whips-up

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Here, from today’s Ottawa Citizen, the truth about Ontario’s power supply and how we don’t need all the extra power we’re producing–we’re actually PAYING to give it away!!! And at the same time, the Ontario government is pushing through more wind projects: we don’t need them, they are causing irreparable harm to rural communities and to wildlife, and wind will NEVER replace coal power. In fact, it needs fossil-fuel backup to operate.

Here is the link, and the story: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology/Ontario+power+generators+shell+surplus+juice/5152855/story.html#Comments

Ontario power generators shell out $35M to get rid of surplus juice

 
 
 
By Don Butler, The Ottawa CitizenJuly 24, 2011
 
 
 

Workers talk outside of a steam generator casing used in nuclear power plants at Babcock & Wilcox Canada’s Cambridge, Ontario manufacturing plant.

Photograph by: Tim Fraser, Calgary Herald

OTTAWA — Ontario’s electricity generators have shelled out $35 million this year to get neighbouring jurisdictions to take surplus power off their hands and are helping to drive up the cost of power to consumers in the process.

According to the province’s Independent Electrical System Operator (IESO), electricity prices were negative — meaning sellers had to pay buyers in the U.S. or Quebec to take surplus electricity — a total of 95 hours in the first six months of this year.

That’s up sharply from the same period in 2010, when there were only 10 hours of negative prices at a cost of $4.2 million. However, it’s down from 2009, when there were 280 hours of negative prices in the first six months, and 351 for the year as a whole.

The number of negative hours spiked in 2009 because the economic recession and mild weather depressed demand while abnormally high water levels increased output at hydro plants, an IESO spokesperson said.

Now a new report by the C.D. Howe Institute is proposing a solution it says will save the system money: paying generators who operate under fixed-priced contracts to produce less power.

Set by supply and demand, wholesale prices in Ontario’s electricity market are updated every five minutes. In a normal market, suppliers would not produce power at low or negative prices, notes the C.D. Howe report.

But the one-time stick of negative pricing is now ineffective because so many Ontario generators are guaranteed fixed payments under long-term contracts, says the report. Until those contracts are renegotiated, generators should be paid to reduce their output if doing so would save money for the system as a whole.

“We need to go from the stick to the carrot,” said Benjamin Dachis, one of the report’s co-authors.

While negative prices were rare until recent years, they will become much more common as more wind and solar projects and two refurbished Bruce nuclear units come on line.

That will result in “periodic gluts of electricity over the coming years and higher costs for Ontario consumers,” warns the C.D. Howe report. In its latest 18-month outlook report in June, the IESO acknowledged that surplus baseload generation “remains an ongoing concern.”

“Next year is when it’s going to get really bad,” Dachis said. “The IESO is forecasting that the minimum daily demand is going to be below the baseline generation pretty much every week next spring and summer.”

Ottawa Citizen

dbutler@ottawacitizen.com

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
 
 
 
 
 
 There is a lot missing from the online version of the story: for example, energy consultant Tom Adams commented: the “irresponsibility” that created the contractual problems with non-utility power generators is continuing as the province signs long-term contracts at inflated prices with wind and solar energy producers. “We’re digging the hole deeper as we speak.”

E-mail us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

The North Gower Wind Action Group is a group of citizens in the North Gower-Richmond-Kars area who are concerned about the impact of a proposed industrial wind power generation project on our community. We are a corporate member of Wind Concerns Ontario Inc., and a signatory to the North American Platform Against Wind.

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