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Posts Tagged ‘Tim Hudak’

More news: this ship is sinking fast. Note Duguid’s comments about the 50,000 jobs being created by “green energy”—none of that is true, and the jobs that are being created come at a price tag–according to Randall Denley of The Citizen, and the experience of other countries like Germany and Spain–of over $300,000 PER JOB.

A new wind action group was born in Ontario this week, too. The citizens of Whittington Ontario are fighting for democracy.

October 14, 2010

Green power driving up prices: Hudak
By ANTONELLA ARTUSO, QMI Agency
 

TORONTO — Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak said he won’t rip up signed energy contracts, but the days of attracting solar and wind power to the province with pledges of highly lucrative rates would end under a PC government.

A Hudak government would also seek out “willing hosts” for energy projects and allow people to opt back to flat electricity rates, he said.

“Energy policy is about economics and stop treating it like a social program,” Hudak said in breakfast speech Thursday hosted by the Ontario Energy Association. “Quite frankly, we cannot continue to pursue green energy policies that unnecessarily drive up the cost for consumers and have punitive impacts on our broader economy.”

With the provincial election less than a year away, and the Ontario Liberals taking heat on rising hydro rates, many players in the power sector were interested to hear Hudak’s vision for energy.

The PC leader said he would hit the green light on new nuclear and water power.

Hudak said he would also put a consumer advocate into the Ontario Energy Board — the body that regulates the province’s electricity and natural gas sectors in the public interest.

While he isn’t dismissing renewable energy, Hudak said wind and solar power can’t continue to be purchased at guaranteed prices well above the market rate for electricity.

The Liberal policy on green energy is driving up hydro prices, he said.

Hudak said one of the measures most needed in electricity is consistency and long-range planning, criticizing both the Liberals who just pulled the plug on a natural gas Oakville power plant after inking a deal, and on his own government under former Conservative Premier Ernie Eves who pulled a “180” when it abruptly abandoned its own plans for the electricity sector.

Energy Minister Brad Duguid said Hudak’s vision is backward-looking and would return the province to a time when it was forced to rely on dirty sources of energy.

It’s the Liberal government’s commitment to finding additional cleaner sources of energy that has given the system the option of nixing the Oakville plant, which is no longer needed to meet electricity demand, he said.

“With (Hudak’s) policies, there’s no question there would have to be a gas plant in Oakville because we wouldn’t have the flexibility to consider any other options,” Duguid said, predicting the Tory leader’s views on hydro would kill many of the 50,000 jobs that the Liberal’s Green Energy Act is creating.

To contact the North Gower Wind Action Group, email northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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In the Globe and Mail today, there is an article about how Canadians feel apathetic about their government. In North Gower, the apathy seems connected to the faith that government WILL do something. Response to the issue of the wind turbines is either “They’ll never let that go through,” or, “If the government approves, it must be OK.”

Here are the facts about government involvement in industrial wind turbines:

-the City of Ottawa COULD join the dozens of other municipalities that have woken up to the fact that the Green Energy Act has removed their ability to plan their communities and protect their citizens, and are now asking for turbine developments to stop until health studies are done. But it won’t. City Council has already voted down a motion on that, saying it’s up to the province. It is, but that doesn’t mean you give up. What you can do: ask your councillor to re-submit the motion, and let the other councillors know how you feel.

-the City’s Medical Officer of Health was asked to look into the health effects of industrial wind turbines and report back to Council in January 2010. His report: he said he is going to follow the Province’s lead.

-the Province said it would appoint a Research Chair to look into health effects from “renewable energy technology”. The person the Council of Ontario Universities recommended is a professor of electrical engineering at Waterloo; he has zero experience in health research. What you can do: demand the Ontario government do independent, real health research (i.e., they actually have to examine and talk to people). Write the premier and let your MPP LisaMacLeod know your thoughts. PC leader Tim Hudak should be aware, too.

-the Province has allowed $1.5 million for five years for the research project. That might sound like a lot of money, but in research terms, it isn’t. It is very likely that nothing substantive will result. (One Ontario doctors has said, however, that a simple sleep study would cost only about $100,000.)

-the Province wants these wind developments to go through very badly; they see them as the great hope for Ontario jobs, and they say it is also our hope for clean, green, renewable energy. It isn’t: wind energy is expensive and unreliable, and the jobs it creates are in the initial stage of manufacturing and installation. Very few jobs result. According to the study of Denmark done by CEPOS there was NO net job creation from almost 20 years of wind development.

-Ontario and Quebec, at a minimum, have a dream of selling power to the U.S. That’s funny, because the U.S. wind developments have the same dream–selling power to Canada. What you can do: keep reading about the business and investment aspects of wind development. And check out your own investments to see whether you are investing in wind development yourself. You might be surprised.

-the federal government has no national standards for development of wind turbines, no health standards, no national strategy. When asked about it, they say it’s a provincial jurisdiction. And the province has taken care of that through the Green Energy Act: no one has any say in anything. What you can do: ask your MP to ask the government to develop national standards and an energy strategy.

If you are concerned about the effect of industrial wind turbines in North Gower-south Richmond because of constant noise and vibration, plus the potential effects on the environment, it’s up to you to let all levels of government know how you feel. Because right now, they’re not doing anything to help the people of Ontario who are living with industrial wind turbines.

Be sure to visit http://windconcernsontario.wordpress.com for daily news.

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