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Posts Tagged ‘wind farm North Gower’

For those who think Europe is the haven for wind power generation done well, and where citizens are happy with the beautiful turbines spinning happily in the breeze, this will be a shock: people are sick, the landscape is ruined, and property values (and lives) devastated.

This short video comes from Russia Today via Facebook; thanks to Esther Wrightman and the Middlesex-Lambton group for calling attention to it.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=703983162949836

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Ottawa Wind Concerns

Back in May, after the decision by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in the case of Wiggins et al vs wpd, we wrote to the Mayor of the City of Ottawa to inform him of the importance of the Court’s decision: that it was acceptable for property owners who live as neighbours to property being leased for industrial-scale wind turbines to sue for property value loss and nuisance at the time of approval of a wind power project (i.e., they do not have to wait until the power project is built), and that the Court accepted that property value loss had already occurred simply with the announcement of the power project near Clearview Ontario, on the order of 22-50 percent.

The effect of the proposed wind power project in North Gower-Richmond will be significant, we wrote , in terms of the potential danger to health (also acknowledged by…

View original post 431 more words

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New South Wales in Australia is being blanketed by industrial wind turbines, in spite of health concerns, rising electricity costs and even a full Senate inquiry into wind power generation.

The effects have been devastating. Here is an interview with sheep farmer Anne Gardner, whose home is a shocking 90 meters from a wind turbine and whose farms is near a wind power generation project, on what has happened to her. She farms sheep for wool and had produced a quality of wool among the best in the world.

The disgust and anger is apparent in the interviewer’s voice as he concludes, we hope that the people will win out eventually.

Our view: legal action is the only resort left to us, when we are fighting the combination of big business and our own government.

Take a few moments to listen to the radio broadcast here: http://www.2gb.com/index2.php?option=com_newsmanager&task=view&id=12922#.T8Q_ITCNCMQ.facebook

If you have a few more minutes, check out this TV news interview, also from Australia: every single point to be made about wind power generation and its effects is in this interview. http://www.todaytonightadelaide.com.au/?page=Story&StoryID=1394

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca and follow us on Twitter at northgowerwind

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Excellent article by Justin Sadler in yesterday’s Ottawa Sun. Mr Sadler quite rightly reviews comments by the Auditor General on the issue of Ontario’s renewable energy policy–there was never a business case made for the policy, no estimates of whether wind power would ever accomplish what was promised for it, and that claims of job creation are just not true.

Read the article here, and then vote in the poll if it remains open.

http://www.ottawasun.com/2012/05/26/turbine-tussle-whips-up

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

Donations toward our work and information packages for government at all levels, gratefully accepted

PO Box 3, North Gower ON   K0A 2T0

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If you follow this blog regularly you know we’ve reported this in the past: that lawyers predicted once people have gone through the frustrating and obstructive review and approval process to try to object to wind power generation projects in Ontario, they will begin to take legal action.

And, we noted that it had already started.

Now, property owners near Collingwood, Ontario are taking action against WPD and two landowners leasing land for turbines, according to this report : http://www.theenterprisebulletin.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3537118

There are so many landowners–and businesses–involved that at the moment, the claim has reached $17 million.

An interesting point here is that the wind power development will affect the Collingwood airport operations. Collingwood is an important local airport. But does the Ontario government care? Nope: wind power development trumps everything, including people’s homes, their property value, their health, and the success of Ontario businesses.

A lot of people are watching this one and they may not wait for a conclusion; it just makes sense to take whatever steps you have to to protect your interests.

Email us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

and follow us on Twitter at northgowerwind

Visit Wind Concerns Ontario at http://www.windconcernsontario.ca for news through the day, and resources.

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Medical publisher SAGE announced yesterday, July 20, that it had published a special edition of the Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society on the health effects of industrial wind turbine projects, called “Windfarms, communities and ecosystems, Part I.”

Here is the abstract from Carl V. Phillips’ paper, on the fact that evidence exists, but policy-makers are not interpreting it, and others such as wind development proponents and environmental non-government organizations (supported by our tax dollars), are denying it.

Properly Interpreting the Epidemiologic Evidence About the Health Effects of Industrial Wind Turbines on Nearby Residents

  1. Carl V. Phillips

    1. Populi Health Institute, Wayne, PA, USA, cvphilo@gmail.com

Abstract

There is overwhelming evidence that wind turbines cause serious health problems in nearby residents, usually stress-disorder-type diseases, at a nontrivial rate. The bulk of the evidence takes the form of thousands of adverse event reports. There is also a small amount of systematically gathered data. The adverse event reports provide compelling evidence of the seriousness of the problems and of causation in this case because of their volume, the ease of observing exposure and outcome incidence, and case-crossover data. Proponents of turbines have sought to deny these problems by making a collection of contradictory claims including that the evidence does not “count,” the outcomes are not “real” diseases, the outcomes are the victims’ own fault, and that acoustical models cannot explain why there are health problems so the problems must not exist. These claims appeared to have swayed many nonexpert observers, though they are easily debunked. Moreover, though the failure of models to explain the observed problems does not deny the problems, it does mean that we do not know what, other than kilometers of distance, could sufficiently mitigate the effects. There has been no policy analysis that justifies imposing these effects on local residents. The attempts to deny the evidence cannot be seen as honest scientific disagreement and represent either gross incompetence or intentional bias.

Other authors are: Dr. John Harrison, Dr. Robert McMurtry, Carmen Krogh, Willem Vanderberg, Bob Thorne, Arline Bronzaft and Martin Shain. You can view the abstracts online here: http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/4.toc

E-mail us at northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Prowind president Cathy Weston has a letter published in today’s Woodstock Sentinel-Review, the newspaper for people living near Prowind’s two southern Ontario proposed projects. Here it is:

Dear Editor,

Mr. Desmond’s grandstand statements about the effects of wind turbines on surrounding property values are anecdotal in nature and certainly do not hold true to scientifi c rigor. A recent study completed within Chatham-Kent concluded there is no statistical evidence to demonstrate that wind farms negatively affect rural residential market values. ( http://www.canwea.ca/pdf/talkwind/Proper tyValuesConsultingReportFebruary42010.pdf)

His comments about the lack of opportunity for taxation because “senior management” are shied away from areas with wind farms is unsubstantiated. He further neglects to remind readers that wind turbines themselves generate tax revenue for the community. Municipalities receive annual tax dollars for the duration of the wind farm based on the output potential of each turbine. Local governments also benefit indirectly from the improvements to roads and other infrastructure that wind developers must upgrade in order to complete development.

Further, development, construction and operation of wind farms bring additional income to the community in the form of jobs and income to the landowners. The development of wind farms on agricultural properties ensures that farming activities can continue for years to come by providing supplementary income to farmers, and protecting against urbanization of rural areas.

The Green Energy Act aimed to streamline the approvals process, to reduce duplication of time and effort in proposal review, and to offer a consistent approach to renewable energy development throughout the Province. That said, the uniqueness of each community in Ontario must continue to be respected. Prowind Canada considers local governments to be an important stakeholder in all projects, providing strong representation for the area. Township and county officials are consulted on all major elements of project development to ensure that their feedback and requirements specific to the community are incorporated into project design.

The wind energy industry is committed to responsible and sustainable development in Ontario and across the country. Setbacks in Ontario for wind turbines are among the most stringent in the world and are designed to protect health and safety of the public. In March 2011, the Ontario Divisional Court decision upheld the current regulations for wind turbine setbacks of 550 metres, stating that these distances were established through extensive public consultation, considering the views of a wide range of stakeholders.

Cathy Weston, President, Prowind Canada Inc.

You can make up your own mind but we have a couple of points for discussion:

-the Chatham-Kent property value study (also known as the Simmons-Canning report, paid for by the Canadian Wind Energy Association/CanWEA) was rife with errors; the authors couldn’t get the results they wanted so they ran analysis after analysis to come to their conclusion. It must be noted that the authors relied only on VIEW of the turbines as a potential factor affecting value; they note that noise and other effects could affect value but they did not study that. There are other studies that DO show a loss in property value such as Appraisal One Group, Chris Luxemburger (who has been a guest in North Gower), Michael McCann and more. For an interview with an Ontario Realtor discussing property values and industrial wind turbines, go to: http://www.bayshorebroadcasting.ca/news_item.php?NewsID=35521 His opinion? 25-40% drop in value. Note also that the Ontario Real Estate Association now lists power projects such as wind turbine installations along with garbage dumps and gravel quarries on its Sellers’ Property Information Sheet or SPIS.

-While it is true that the landowners leasing land for industrial wind turbines are paid for their leases, there are very few jobs associated with industrial wind power projects. Most of the jobs are in the very short-term for construction, and then afterward, there is only one job per 10 turbines at most, if you follow the example of other projects. At Wolfe Island, for example, three local jobs have been created, for 86 turbines.

-“Protecting against urbanization of rural areas”???????????? We fail to see how industrializing a village and its surroundings by installing an industrial wind power generation project is protecting anything.

Let’s have another quote from Prowind, shall we? Bart Geleynse, speaking to Mark Sutcliffe on Rogers TV, April 2010. Sutcliffe: Do the turbines make noise? Geleynse: “Of course they do; they’re power plants.”

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In the April issue of Farmers’ Forum is an update on the Marlborough industrial wind project proposed for North Gower and Richmond; as we already knew, the project is waiting for transmission capacity to be assessed before it can get a Feed-in Tariff contract with the Ontario Power Authority.

Here is the story:

April 2011

North Gower wind turbine project stalled due to gridlock

NORTH GOWER — The wait continues for approval of a 20-megawatt wind project that would erect between eight and 10 wind turbines around the village of North Gower and south Richmond.

Prowind Canada Inc., a Kemptville-based company, first applied to the Ontario Power Authority’s Feed-in Tariff (FIT) program for a contract in November 2009. The project was rejected in the last wave of FIT approvals in early February because the OPA could not handle the power capacity. Now Prowind is waiting on a connection test that would take three to six months so the company can know when the capacity for the project might be available. Prowind has not received word when the connection test would commence but a spokeswoman said the company hopes it will start in April.

Five farmers in North Gower are involved with the project to have the wind turbines – which could be up to 600 ft. high – on their land. Corner View Farms, operated by brothers Ed and Rick Schouten, could have five wind turbines at their dairy operation. Farmers would share in the profits made by the wind turbines’ generation of power back to the provincial grid. They would also have access to the roads Prowind would build to the wind turbines, offering easier access to crops.

 

Here is the link.

http://www.farmersforum.com/APRIL2011/p42a.htm

Meanwhile, Ontario continues to dump power because it has an excess of power this spring; to date, Ontario has paid other jurisdictions to take the extra power off our hands, costing taxpayers millions of dollars.

In other news, the Ottawa Citizen today carries a report from the U.K. in which the government’s “climate change watchdog” says “heavy reliance on offshore wind could result in unacceptable increases in fuel bills.” The recommendation is to rely on nuclear power which produces no carbon dioxide. The story is on page C5 in The Citizen and originates in The Times.

northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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Corporate wind developer Prowind claims it didn’t get an invitation to the recent public session sponsored by three local wind action community groups, which attracted more than 125 residents concerned about proposed industrial wind turbine projects. The company’s manager of operations Cathy Weston told a reporter for The Advance that “I didn’t get an invitation.”

Well, here’s the thing: No one got an “invitation.”

But plenty of people knew about the meeting: more than a thousand flyers were delivered by Canada Post to homes in Richmond, North Gower, Kars, and South Branch, and advertisements were paid for and appeared in the EMC from Carleton Place through to Winchester, in the Manotick Messenger, and in The Ottawa Citizen. As well, news stories were carried on the CBC and CFRA prior to the event.

Hardly a secret event!

northgowerwindactiongroup@yahoo.ca

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According to Energy Probe executive director Lawrence Solomon, writing in today’s Financial Post, “the largest grass roots movement in the western world today is no longer anti-nuclear, it is anti-wind.”

We’re proud to be part of it.

Read the reasons why at http://opinion.financialpost.com/2010/10/12/ontario-power-lesson/

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